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  1. The Freedom of Choice One of the main tenets of both Kodi and open-source software in general is freedom of choice. By making the software freely and publicly available without charge, users are able to try the software with no financial outlay or risk. As the source code is also available for inspection, the risks of "hidden nasties" such as covert information gathering and other data mining can also be alleviated. Anyone can download, review and audit any part of the software that they wish, as well as submitting any updates, improvements and bug fixes that they may make. This notion of user choice is also key to the operation and support offered by Team Kodi, both through GitHub and the web forum. One common question is why we don't do more to combat piracy, especially given our zero tolerance policy towards support (or lack thereof, aside from attempts to completely remove from infected systems). The simple answer is that we believe in user choice, and that if the user makes the conscious and informed decision that they want to use Kodi for such purposes then that is up to them. Similarly, any resultant technical or legal problems which may arise are also down to them, and there's no liability or responsibility on Team Kodi for what a user has chosen to do. An Informed Choice Key to that stance, though, is that the user has made an informed choice. This is the reason why third-party repositories are not usable by default in Kodi. The user has to make a specific action to enable their usage, complete with a warning pop-up message about the risks and liabilities involved. We take responsibility for our official repository and what we we allow into it, and content is reviewed and audited before it is included. Any fork of Kodi which seeks to override or remove this default setting would immediately be blacklisted by the team, and no support for it at all would be offered by any official Team Kodi outlet. Similarly, this is why the team does not allow forks with pre-installed add-ons to be made without complete rebranding and disassociation from Kodi, and why no "builds" are supported. By "build", here we use the term in the common user parlance (as can be found on many of the third-party YouTube videos and parasitic "fan" websites that we would rather did not exist) for collections of add-ons either grouped into an "all in one" installation, or even images of Kodi with such add-ons pre-installed. This obviously completely removes the user choice element, aside from the choice to install the build in the first place. The main issues here are twofold. Firstly, whilst such builds tend to install popular piracy add-ons, they often also quietly install other code under the hood with little or no visibility to the user. This can range from scripts that try to maintain the installation (given the limited lifespan of such add-ons) to ones that aim to sabotage or remove those of rival suppliers - and, in the extreme, even to malicious malware scripts to form botnets, mine digital coinage or perform other nefarious actions behind the user's back. Secondly, such builds tend to be advertised on websites and in videos as being official, legal and legitimate. This is often deliberately done to confuse the naive user that they are getting something for nothing and a good deal. Of course, a moment's thought and common sense should tell anyone that if media providers such as Sky, HBO and Disney charge people what they do for their officially-provided services, then offers of them for free cannot be above board. Similarly, sources or add-ons offering media that wouldn't normally be available, such as movies that are still in cinema theatres, should also ring alarm bells in the head of any consumer. Uncommon Sense, or Stating the Obvious? Unfortunately in this day and age such common sense does not seem to apply to the internet. We often see this on the forum when new users request support for such installations and then apologise with "sorry, I didn't know" or similar when we decline to assist. They completely miss the point that it was their choice and basic greed that led them there, and a moment's thought should have given them pause. For some reason users seem to willingly accept the most obviously dodgy deals on the internet, ones that they wouldn't touch if offered in a pub car park, car boot sale or other "real world" environment. Our simple advice is to apply the same judgement to your Kodi installation as you would to anything else in life. If the deal you're being offered seems too good to be true, it quite probably is and there will be a catch somewhere. The team works hard to provide the Kodi software and also to curate the official repository. Both of these can be safely used when obtained from our official site. However, beyond that, the principles of caveat emptor apply. We expect and enforce that users are responsible for their own actions and the repercussions from them. So before using any third party repository or add-on, take a moment to consider what you know about the authors, their reputation and what they are offering. Don't be fooled by false promises and dodgy deals - in the end the person responsible for your devices' safety and security is you. Tags: Addon Banned addons Education tips View the full article...
  2. Two months have passed since our last bugfix release and already we have a new one ready for consumption. Fancy a few more features? There aren't any, with one teeny-tiny exception. Apparently DTS-HD audio only tracks are a thing and Kodi can now play them like any other music format. That's it. No more features. Seriously. However, since Kodi 18.3 is a bugfix release, we have a boatload of erm... fixes. In fact, too many to mention. Below is a non-exhaustive list of (mostly) usability fixes. Estuary Fixed favourites widget not scrolling properly on 16:10 displays Fixed API button was not reachable with a mouse on Settings window Fixed Skin Settings window scrollbar focus Fixed order of TV Show title and Episode title in Video Info dialog Added Search button to the side menu in the Video and Music windows Fixed Wall and Infowall views scroll to bottom on certain aspect-ratios Fixed broken side menu navigation in the Addon Browser window PVR Fixed a Group Manager crash when adding a new group Fixed EPG UI corruption and/or EPG data not showing with newly added channels Fixed PVR guide window channel data being overwritten Music Added support for DTS-HD audio tracks Fixed wrong album or artist thumb art being picked from scraper results The remaining fixes are under the hood and range from addressing nasty memory leaks to DVD playback from HTTPS sources, with a couple of crash and burn events in between. A special thanks to all the users that found a bug, took the time to report it and, in some cases, provided a fix. The full v18.3 changelog can be found in our GitHub milestone. If you want to read back on what was actually changed in v18 itself, you can find the corresponding articles in the blog posts - Kodi 18, Kodi 18.1 and Kodi 18.2. As usual, Kodi 18.3 availability on Google Play and Microsoft Store may take a few more days. Stay tuned. Tags: Release Announcements View the full article...
  3. Yesterday the new Raspberry Pi 4B was unveiled with a revised spec that guarantees it will be super-popular with Kodi users. It brings 4K media support, faster CPUs, faster memory, faster Ethernet, faster USB, and now handles HEVC natively. It's a great update on the previous 3B+ model, and at $35 for the 1G model it's also a bargain, and we predict it will be a massively popular way to run Kodi via distro's like LibreELEC, OSMC and Raspbian. The 4B's board layout is different to previous models so upgrading (and new) users will need a new case – and what better to wrap a Pi 4B in than a Kodi Edition Flirc case! Retaining the design language that made the original case great, the Flirc case has been re-tooled to accommodate the Raspberry Pi 4B's ports and CPU placement ensuring maximum cooling efficiency. Otherwise it's the same winning formula and gorgeous design as the previous 3B/3B+ Kodi Edition case. The main body is Aluminium and designed to act as a heatsink that keeps the BCM2711 chip in your 4B cool. The top surface of the Aluminium has been mirror-polished to catch your eye, and the Kodi branded top uses soft-touch plastics so it not only looks great, it feels great too. Flirc is well into manufacturing and are offering an early bird discount of 30%. At USD $11.20 (normal price USD $15.95) that's a steal! – and orders will ship in late July. Flirc is also offering the 3B/3B+ case at the same discounted rate to clear remaining inventory. Team Kodi receives a royalty on each Kodi branded case sold – and alongside t-shirt sales it's one of the main sources of funding for the Kodi Foundation. Flirc also donate a percentage of the sale to Cancer research at the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, which plays a key role in personal back-story to Flirc. Tags: Community Updates Featured Software and Hardware Site News Galleries: View the full article...
  4. Repos: When All-in-one Can Be No Fun. For better or worse, one of the most powerful features of Kodi is the ability to extend its capabilities via addons. Key components in this are the repositories, or "repos" as they're more commonly known. They allow for quick and simple installation and upgrade of addons, but as with the whole topic they too have a darker and riskier side that many users do not consider. Before we go into details of those risks, let's first set the background by considering what a repo actually is and what it enables. As most users know, there are two main ways of expanding Kodi's functionality with addons - install from zip and install from repo. Install from zip does exactly what it says on the tin: it installs a given addon into Kodi using a zip file package that contains the addon code. That zip file may be either downloaded from the internet and transferred onto the device where Kodi is running, or it can be accessed directly over the internet via an added source (most commonly through the Kodi file manager). This route is mainly intended for addon development purposes, prior to release and inclusion in a repo. There are two main issues with this approach. The first problem is that the installation is then static. If the addon is updated or modified, Kodi won't know this and any updates will need to be manually installed by the user. The second issue, however, is the one most commonly encountered by users, in that any other addons or code that the original addon depends on (that it uses or references, and requires to be installed for it to run) will not be automatically installed. Thus, for the original addon to operate and not just generate log errors or crash, all of its dependencies, both the correct packages and the correct versions, need to be manually located and installed separately. So, What's a Better Way? Using a repo can solve both of these issues. A Kodi repo contains links to the current (and, commonly, also older) versions of the addon plus any required dependencies. So it acts as a "one stop shop" to install the given addon, with the bonus that it can be done via the Kodi GUI using the Install from repo option. With the exception of the official Kodi repo (which comes built into the Kodi core code), the only install from zip that is required is the original one to install the repo itself. The real power of the repo, though, is that when the addon author updates their addon and pushes that new version to the repo (whether the official one or their own third-party one which the user has installed), then Kodi will see that the update is available and can either offer the update or just update it automatically, depending on configuration. So, with minimal or even no user effort, addons can be quickly and easily maintained, and distributed, keeping all user devices up to date. Sounds Great - What's the Catch? That update functionality is where the potential risks come into play, however, especially for the common third party "all-in-one" repos (containing addons from multiple authors) that can be obtained from various internet sites and sources. Currently, if a newer version (with a higher version number) of a given addon is pushed to an installed repo, then the addon can be updated regardless of which repo the addon originally came from. Hence, if a malicious programmer pushes a new version of an addon (which may or may not be their own) to an installed repo, then anyone who had the original version will get the poisoned version installed onto their device instead. This is a obviously a very undesirable outcome and would lead to widespread issues if a popular addon were to be subverted. Another big issue with third-party repos is the fact the domain name might be abandoned and expire while users still have the repository installed. This could enable an attacker to later register that expired domain, effectively taking it over. They could then replace the existing addon content with malicious code. This exact scenario is a significant enough risk to have been covered in several security conferences last year, for example this one. If Only Someone Could Do Something... There have been internal Team Kodi discussions on how to manage this risk, ranging from disallowing third-party repos completely, through to only allowing addons to update from their original repo, and on to the official stance of leaving things as they are as all of this should be the user's responsibility anyway. Another issue is that there are cases which complicate any such restrictions, such as the use of testing "beta" repos for unstable versions of addons either under construction or for adding new features. This most commonly applies to skins, but also when addon authors make early or "bleeding edge" versions of new or existing addons available for public testing using this method. In the case of the built-in official repo, each and every addon submitted to it is thoroughly reviewed, examined and tested by the repo maintainers (all Team Kodi members) to ensure it poses no risk to our user base. There are also limitations placed on addons - such as containing no pre-compiled, obfuscated or executable code ("binary blobs") - all to try and stop our addon update system becoming a distribution path for malware. For third-party repos though, no such checks are, of course, performed by the team. So for each repo to be installed, the user - that means you! - should consider where it has come from, and whether they trust the author or organisation that has supplied it. Ask yourself whether they maintain such diligence over what is included in the repos they provide. For cases such as the well-known individual addon author and their beta repos containing only their own work, the risks are often minimal. The "all-in-one" style repos, though, obviously offer a significantly higher risk of problems, especially for those that just seem to scrape any and all repos that they can access on the net, often without author agreement or consent. This is why many such repos are included on the Team Kodi banned addons list, although their common inclusion of banned piracy addons would place them on the list anyway. It's also why Team Kodi offers no support for "builds" which pre-install addons or repos, as this is another common gateway to malware problems. And for those who may be under the illusion that this is just a hypothetical scenario, the stark reality is that such hijacking cases, "code flame wars" and distribution of malware-infected code have all actually occurred in the past using these exact methods. It is a genuine and real risk. Team Kodi and its members are working towards improving the addon/repository infrastructure. A lot of tools have been developed in the last few years. Some examples of this include: Kodi-addon-generator by Razzeee - simplified creation of new addons based around a standard requirements template. Kodistubs by romanvm - stubs for the Kodi Python API. Kodi-addon-submitter also by romanvm - simplify addon submissions to the repository via Travis. Addon-check (initiated/mentored by Razzeee and implemented as a GSOC 2018 project) - check addons for known problems and deprecations. In conclusion, then: before you install any third-party addon, repo or build onto your Kodi device, pause and consider whether you really trust the source you're getting it from and any repercussions that may result from that install. Tags: Addon Banned addons Education Repos tips View the full article...
  5. It's that time again. After unleashing Kodi v18 Leia into the wild, it's time to give the upcoming Kodi 19 a codename. As usual, our users suggested a myriad of names, most right up our alley, some less... erm... "appropriate". After compiling suggestions from the community thread, Facebook and Twitter, we arrived at the top 10 list: Magneto Mars Marvel Marvin Matrix Megatron Merlin Metropolis Mordor Morpheus At first glance it seems a consensual list. Nothing out of the ordinary and, with the possible exception of "Mars", all science fiction related. Next, we needed to decide what to do: follow the users' top suggestion as we've done in the past? Have team members vote to decide the name? Or maybe pick a completely different codename for Kodi v19 – Kodi "Muppet", maybe? With so many great suggestions, we decided a team vote was the way to go. So we did, and "Matrix" won the vote. And then all hell broke loose. Some team members argued we should be less predictable and geeky, that we could use some out-of-the-box thinking, choose something completely different, etc. What ensued was truly horrific. Geeks cursed each other, pizza boxes got thrown, beer was spilled, perfectly-formatted CSS insults flew, moms' basements destroyed all over the world. I mean, spilled beer! Utter madness. Bottom line – with such a great list of suggestions and a team vote, we still couldn't reach an agreement. And, for a while, we actually contemplated settling for Kodi "MultiPass". Nahh, just kidding! The users have spoken, the team has voted and, in the end, geekiness has won! Kodi "Matrix" it is. Tags: Community Updates View the full article...
  6. Just when you thought we were all having a rest for Easter, here's some surprise news for you: Kodi "Leia" 18.2 is ready to roll. The sun is shining and the sky is blue here in western Europe, and we're all tied to our keyboards to bring you the latest Kodi loveliness. We're kind like that. In keeping with the 18.x maintenance release cycle, this is a bug fix release, with no real new functionality. What's worth noting, however, is how we've identified and managed the bugs this time. We've always valued high-quality bug reports, and, for this reason, for 18.x we implemented an issue template and an automated verification system in the GitHub issue tracker. This makes the bug reports more complete, and gives the Kodi developers a better chance to pinpoint problems more accurately and fix them more quickly. The aim is to solve the problem of waiting for proper full debug logs, samples and suchlike, hopefully saving a lot of time and getting issues resolved more quickly. Hopefully, you can see the results of this new process in the 18.x bug fix releases. For this 18.2 release we are also grateful to have received many code contributions from outside Team Kodi. With this help we were able to fix performance and dependency regressions in our GLES rendering path. Similar fixes were contributed for the AML platform, which really hasn't received much love over the past years. VAAPI on Intel has gained some corrections for interlaced content that toggled interlaced flags during playback, and therefore caused stutter by reconfiguring the decoder. Amongst other things, work has continued on Kodi's music experience: database access speed has been optimised as well as improved import functionality. Similarly, there have been fixes and improvements across all aspects of PVR, with a couple of particularly nasty bugs sent on their way. You can also find a huge number of improvements for the Android platform. Because of the automated Google tests done in the Play store, we were able to track down and resolve a lot of issues revealed by those "drunken monkey" tests. Beside all the fixes, we have introduced a Codec Factory (Android only) where power users can configure HW-Decoder usage in a fine-grained way. Most box sellers only provide usable codecs for formats which they use to sell content. Other format support tends to be poor, and therefore a configurable heuristic-based codec and video dimensions was added. The settings can be configured by the user in human-readable and writable XML format. More information can be found in the related pull request. We will continue to work on Leia: an 18.3 release will be drafted once we have important fixes for this release. In the meantime, development on version 19 M* has begun. We will officially announce its new codename shortly. A small spoiler: "May the force be with you - always". But this time we will switch universes (and here's another hint: you might find it on GitHub already if you know where to look...). The full v18.2 changelog can be found in our GitHub milestone. If you want to read back on what was actually changed in v18 itself, you can find the corresponding articles in the blog posts - Kodi 18, Kodi 18.1. Tags: Release Announcements View the full article...
  7. This is going to be short and sweet: we proudly present KodiTV™ MultiPass! Starting at 00:00 UTC, our servers will deploy an update to your Kodi install if you're in North America (Canada not included) or Europe. Unfortunately the broadcasting rights don't allow us to offer the service to other regions yet. More on that later. KodiTV™ offers the best of all major content providers, combined in one single add-on. Starting now, we will support five streaming providers, with more to come: Netflix HULU HBO Amazon Prime Youtube Premium KodiTV™ add-on will give you four subscription tiers: Micropass: $0.99 per movie and $0.29 per TV show episode from any of our content providers (any content provider) MultiPass: $14.99/month from up to three of our content providers (providers selectable each month) Megapass: $23.99/month all providers right at your finger tips Monsterpass : watch everything for $199 a year (unlimited tier) Have fun! ; Tags: Community Updates View the full article...
  8. The so-called Kodi builds are essentially a preconfigured Kodi install that someone created, ready for you to use. They often come bundled with wizards, tons of third-party add-ons, and a boatload of stuff you don't need or doesn't work. In essence, Kodi builds take out of the equation Kodi's most prized feature, the "endless configure and costumize" part. Yes, we all know Kodi isn't exactly easy to setup for the novice user. That is the main reason why so many people use Kodi builds. That and the streaming add-ons already installed and ready to use. Speaking of which, there's an important distinction to be made between official and third-party add-ons. Official add-ons are reviewed and curated by Kodi Team members and if they meet all the rules, included in our official add-ons repository. Of course, this means that no add-on that circumvents a paywall or provides illegal or free access to content that you would otherwise have to pay for, is accepted in our repository. Enter thirdy-party add-ons. It's noteworthy to point out that most third-party add-ons aren't illegal. They are authored by legitimate developers that, like us, give their free time to the benefit of the community. Those developers choose not to submit the add-ons to our repository for a variety of reasons, but the add-ons are legal. Just not official. But some are illegal. A few are both illegal and just downright nasty, and some rogue developers even think your hardware is their hardware. These developers and the surrounding ecosystem only care about popularity or money. Yes, they do make money from you, selling that marvellous VPN that you so desperately need to feel safe, showing you ads galore, promising everything for free. We know the story. A work colleague told you about a wonderful software that makes it very easy to watch your favorite sports, movies and TV shows online and for free. You go out and buy a Kodi box. You plug it to your TV set and voila! Instant free entertainment! Now, if it sounds like it can't be legit because it literally sounds too good to be true and that they must be dodgy or bonkers doing all this for nothing, I can tell you your spidey senses are absolutely correct. It is too good to be true and there is no such thing as a free lunch. We can see the appeal of Kodi builds, but please stop using them. Help us improve our documentation, suggest usability improvements, a feature, whatever helps us improve Kodi. Tags: Community Updates View the full article...
  9. Don't be fooled by the cool wallpaper above - we do not sell hardware. We do not sell computers, Kodi boxes, Kodi sticks, carrot sticks or french fries. Actually, we don't recommend specific hardware, and we're certainly not interested in selling hardware. That's the manufacturer's job. The only thing we're interested in is writing software, keeping Kodi in tip-top shape, and advising you about how to better use Kodi. We are not associated with any hardware companies, particular brand or site selling the so-called "Kodi boxes" or "Kodi sticks". There is no such thing. So, for the last time, we do not sell hardware. However, we and our community will assist you with purchasing hardware by providing unbiased information where we look out for your best interest and what works best with Kodi. Head over to our hardware community forums, read a bit, tell us about your use case, and you'll get relevant information. Tags: Community Updates View the full article...
  10. The Kodi Foundation is very proud to announce that it has joined the Linux Foundation as an Associate Member. It seemed natural for us to join, given the fact that we are strong believers in the benefits of open-source software. We strongly believe that open-source is the best way to achieve awesome things. That was and still is what moves Kodi forward. Ever since XBMP, where this project started, a small group of like-minded individuals from different backgrounds have worked together to achieve a goal, taking advantage of each other's merits and talents. That leads to true innovation. Innovation that would not be possible if Kodi's code base was closed source. Innovation that would not be possible if the goals were constrained by corporate vision and allocated resources. This is a story that happens every day. An individual shares some code thinking "meh, no one is interested in this". Two days later someone across the globe sends a patch to fix a bug or suggest an improvement. Now there are two individuals working on a common problem. They don't know each other but they are working together, sharing ideas. When people cooperate and share, the project at hand and the community will always benefit. The Linux Foundation is a non-profit consortium dedicated to fostering the growth of Linux and open source in general, providing support for the open-source community through financial and intellectual resources, governance structure, IT infrastructure, services, events, and training and certification. Some of its most notable work includes sponsoring the Linux creator Linus Torvalds, maintaining the Linux trademark and linux.com website and organizing the world’s leading Linux conferences where the creators, maintainers and practitioners of the most important open source projects meet. With more than 1000 members across the world, the Linux Foundation has taken its experience and expertise in supporting the Linux community to help establish, build, and sustain some of the most critical open source technologies. Its work today extends far beyond Linux, fostering innovation in every layer of the software stack, hosting projects spanning enterprise IT, embedded systems, consumer electronics, cloud, networking, and more. Tags: Community Updates View the full article...
  11. We are thrilled to announced that Kodi has been accepted as a participating open source organization in Google Summer of Code 2019! What is Google Summer of Code? In Google's own words, "Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is a global program that matches students up with open source, free software and technology-related organizations to write code and get paid to do it! The organizations provide mentors who act as guides through the entire process, from learning about the community to contributing code. The idea is to get students involved in and familiar with the open source community and help them to put their summer break to good use." See? Simple as that. Many open source projects — such as Kodi — have participated in GSoC for years. It has proven to be a very useful program to bring together students that want to get involved with the open source community and open source projects in need of new contributors. Plus, if your friends ask what you're doing on your Summer break, you get to say you're working with Kodi and Google. How cool is that? Student applications Student applications to GSoC start on March 25, 2019. We encourage all prospective participants to present their ideas and proposals on the GSoC 2019 forums. Please read our GSoC guidelines carefully before submitting your proposal. There are several project ideas available on our Wiki. Regardless if you are looking into working on a suggested project or one of your own creation, you are strongly encouraged to engage on the forums or join #kodi-gsoc on Freenode so that the community and potential mentors can learn about it, ask questions, discuss narrowing or broadening the proposal, etc. Proposals must be submitted following the proposal outline format. Key dates The complete Google Summer of Code 2019 calendar can be found here but the most important dates for students are outlined below: March 25 (18:00 UTC) - Student application begins April 9 (18:00 UTC) - Deadline to file your student application May 6 (18:00 UTC) - Accepted student proposals are announced May 27 - Coding begins. Start your engines! Please pay special attention to the application deadline. Two weeks fly by in no time. Take time to craft a thoughtful project proposal and discuss it with the community and prospective mentors. Happy GSoC! Tags: Community Updates GSoC View the full article...
  12. Upcoming bug fix release.. Two weeks have past since the official release of v18.0, and hopefully you all like it as much as we do. A final release always comes with some unexpected bugs or improvements that needed a bit more time. In the months to come we will bring you regular v18 updates that included bug fixes and improvements. In this 18.1 Release Candidate we have included the following changes: Speed up Player and Playlists operations with JSON-RPC Define a senseful default value for advanced settings 'updateemptytagsinterval' Revert edge case crash fix that caused DVDs to be not recognised on Mac OS Remove "dxvaallowhqscaling" advanced setting to prepare for DXVA improvements in v18.2 for Windows Linux X11: fix usage of required configuration values Add date to the log records Don't react on DPI change event on Win10 >= FCU Fix Android MediaCodec freeze when early disposing stream Flush streamplayers if abort is requested which solves waiting too long. Skippingskip DVD screens for example Fix ListitemAbsolute and ListItemPosition in GUI engine Ignore very first "server not reachable" notification for PVR servers Use extended result codes for SQLite Fix invalid PTS decoder value which should inprove MPEG2 playback on Android devices update SSL CA trust store Handle empty vertex buffers in GUIFontTTFGL which caused a hard crash Reintroduce setting "Close channel OSD after switching channels" for PVR Fix thread logging on Android which cause issues like gettings frozen on DVD/Bluray playback Avoid attempt to load music info for smartplaylists Fix Top 100 Albums regression RenderCapture: Only query Occlusion if GL lower 1.5 Check current mode if whitelist doesn't match and take correct action Check if app intent is valid on Android. This fixes a hard crash when trying to open Kodi again Fix PVR input stream creation for pvr file items only containing a path and no recording/channel tag. Fixe playing VP9 streams using inputstream addon. It failed because codec extradata is not existant for this stream codec. Catch an exception while reading or writing a file Fix logical "or" operation in GUI engine Check the system capabilities to support sleep states S1/S2/S3/S4 before reporing them as available Fix crash in PCSX ReARMed with BIOS Several Estuary cosmetic fixes The full v18.1 RC1 changelog can be found in our Github milstone. If you want to read back on what was actually changed in v18 itself you can find these in the blog posts list. The V18 "Leia" T-shirt Inspired by the "galaxy far, far away" theme, our resident artist Sam went above and beyond and designed perhaps the coolest Kodi announcement video of all time. We loved his work so much that we're modelling the Kodi 18 shirt after it, along with more art to come. Here it is, our newest, coolest shirt: K-18L - available in several shirt colours and not just black or white. Changelog The Kodi 18 changelog wiki page gives a list of changes for this release; those seeking a more technical listing can view the merged pull requests on GitHub. Thanks As always, this is a huge team effort, and our collective thanks go out to all the developers who submitted code, whether that was thousands of lines of a core new feature or a couple of lines to fix a skin bug. Thanks go out to the ecosystem of add-on and skin developers who updated or created new add-ons to use new functionality in Kodi 18.0. Likewise, we're indebted to the many beta and release candidate testers who took time to explore the pre-release application, file bug reports, test fixes and assist the team with resolving issues. And finally ... special thanks go our to our tireless team of forum moderators, and all those who spend time in our forum and enjoy being part of our community to share tips and tricks and help others. Without all of you, this project would be nothing. Help! If you experience any issues or find any remaining bugs, please post in the General Support section of our forum (please be mindful of our forum rules when posting!). If you have fixes for issues please submit a pull request with your changes to our master branch on GitHub. We also welcome users who want to help answer questions in the forum or write articles for the wiki. Donate To show support and appreciation for Kodi, please consider making a donation or purchasing merchandise such as a T-shirt or Raspberry Pi case. All donations or profits go to the XBMC Foundation and are typically used for team travel to attend conferences, operating expenses, hardware and software licences for developers, legal fees, and the annual developer conference. Download and install Since this is a continuation of the v18 series you can simply install these builds on top of you existing installation. Go to the Official download page and choose the platform of choice and you will find these builds under the pre release tab. View the full article...
  13. At the beginning of the month seven Team Kodi members attended FOSDEM, Europe's largest meeting of Free and Open Source Software Developers that takes place over two days each year in Brussels, Belgium. FOSDEM is a great opportunity to meet-up amongst oursevles, and with friends from projects like VideoLAN and FFmpeg. Day 1 started early with Martijn's presentation on Kodi v18 in the Open Media devroom. The room was fully packed, so if you couldn't attend or catch the livestream you can watch a recording of the session here. After that, we hung out in-front of the room to continue talking with interested attendees and answering questions. In a first for the team, we also held a Kodi meet-up in the BoF room. We did not know what to expect or if anyone would show up to chat, but despite some minor room confusion (not the one we advertised on our blog, but FOSDEM got it right) our concerns disappeared when 15-20 people arrived. There was no specific agenda, but several users engaged us on topics like Linux/NVIDIA support or the new RetroPlayer experience. We were also asked how to participate in the project without being a C++ or Python coder, and this led to some of the team members active in the project for a long time sharing some of the backstories behind our efforts. As a small reward for choosing to attend our meet-up instead of one of the numerous alternatives, we handed out free Kodi stickers. Unfortnuately there is no recording of this session, but if you were present and have feedback or want us to do this again next year? Please contact us. Day 2 had no Kodi-specific events so we could mingle with the crowds, visit the booths of other projects, and watch talks we were interested in. It sounds like a lazy day, but was actually hard work due to the impressive number of people attending this year! We would like to publicly thank the organisers for another awesome FOSDEM weekend, and we look forward to attending again next year! Lastly we owe thanks to our sponsors and donors whose support enables us to attend events like FOSDEM to represent the project and engage our users. If you want to support Kodi and have some spare change, please consider making a donation. View the full article...
  14. Kodi

    [Kodi News] Kodi 18.0

    Kodi 18 is here! <drum roll> ... after another long gestation... the Kodi team is very pleased to announce the immediate availability of Kodi 18.0 "Leia" for all supported platforms (UWP for Windows Store and Xbox is working its way through the system as I type, so will be available shortly...). While we were planning to move more to a "release early, release often" model, this has some significant changes that really needed to be tested and bedded in before we launched it, so it did take a little longer than we'd hoped. It was, though, a worthwhile wait :) To put it in some kind of context, this version includes: Approaching 10,000 commits (code chunks changed) More than 3000 pull-requests (collection of commits that were included in one go) Nearly 9,000 changed files Nearly half a million line of code added, and much the same number removed Over 36 open source developers A lot of dedicated free time conceiving, designing, developing and testing these changes (and all the infrastructure you see around them, including this web site) Quite literally many, many cases of beer and wine We've covered many of the detailed changes in this release in previous blog posts, but here's a quick summary of what you'll find in this new release: Retroplayer gaming and associated game control support One of the big features of this release: support for gaming emulators, ROMs and controls. This is a significant topic in its own right, so look out for future posts on this, but suffice it to say at this time that you now have a whole world of retro gaming at your fingertips, all from the same interface as your movies, music and TV shows. For the genuine experience as well, we've also introduced support for joysticks, gamepads, and other platform-specific controls, so the games will work just as was intended. Digital Rights Management decryption support Early days in many ways, but this opens a whole new world of content for Kodi. Depending on your hardware and licensing, Kodi can now access external DRM handlers and then play subscription content just like any other local media. This is significant in a time when so many people are switching to protected streaming content; there are already several add-ons available that make use of this functionality, and we genuinely hope that we'll see support from other content providers in the future. Music Library – new ways to explore and enjoy your music collection Significant improvements including better filtering (media source, artist gender, type etc.); artist sort name; enhanced artwork; faster API access (particularly useful if you're controlling Kodi by remote with the TV off). Creating and using the music library is even smoother than before. If you have never bothered to use the music library, or maybe never even used Kodi as a music player, then we encourage you to try this feature in Leia! Live TV improvements, including support for new back-ends Support for RDS (Radio Data System), automatic selection on startup ("boot to live TV/radio", if you like), improved OSD and PVR information, enhanced EPG and PVR actions, and many more. Back end support has been updated across the board, with new support for Zattoo, Teleboy, and Sledovanitv.cz . Binary addon support and the binary addon repository While we've actually been using platform-specific binary addons for some time - think PVR addons and screensavers - there's been a lot of work to expand this functionality and move to a more modular architecture as a result. This has effectively halved the main Kodi installer in size, as you now have the option to install some of these functions as you need them instead of them coming pre-bundled. The architecture also now opens the door for other types of pre-compiled binaries, perhaps to provide access to different media sources. The binary repository is currently available for Android, OSX and Windows; Linux users will still have to use the PPA, while iOS and UWP will continue to include the binary add-ons in the installer because of platform limitations. Android Leanback and voice control Kodi can now show its library contents on the main Android TV interface, with full voice functionality: unwatched random movies and unlistened-to albums, binge watch suggestions, and more. Voice integration allows you to search for content with Google Assistant, using the same feature for "voice typing" wherever you see the traditional Kodi on-screen keyboard. Playback improvements (audio and video), including improved Blu-ray support The video player is core to so much of what Kodi does, and some significant changes have been made to the architecture to ensure we're better able to cope with 4K, 8K, HDR and similar, as well as keeping up with the variety of CODECs out there. Changes have been made to priority, to ensure that video gets the most attention from the CPU/GPU for smoothest-possible playback. Elements have been moved out into binary addons, so components can potentially be updated outside of the main Kodi code base. We've also improved Blu-ray support in terms of disc detection and metadata, BD-J menu support (subject to Java support on the device), there are updated external interfaces for e.g. MPEG DASH and RTMP input, and there are improvements to 3d playback (including in 2D mode) and various changes to specific CODECs. On the audio side, there's a wealth of improvements and new support for all types of playback system: ALSA, PulseAudio, OSS, Pi Audio, DirectSound, WASAPI, Darwin, SndIO "Estuary" skin modifications and changes to the GUI/skinning engine Many of the other changes listed here have an obvious ripple effect on the Kodi interface, so we've made change to support these: the gaming modules and associated libraries and the PVR changes, for example. We've also updated keyboard layouts for more languages, updated image resources, changed API calls, improved response times with optimisations for e.g. scaling and redrawing. Revised codebase and build guides Starting with this release, our build guides are kept up-to-date against the current code base - current, as in (hopefully!) up-to-date against a single pull request or code commit. That means that we no longer need to maintain How-Tos and standalone guides, and you will be able to reliably find a build guide for any point in time, even retrospectively. Platform Specifics As a multi-platform application, Kodi inevitably has to be updated in different ways for different operating systems, whether that's simply to keep up or whether it's to unlock new functionality. Android gets API bumps, speech-to-text, SD card support, among other things; BSD gets all-round improved support, especially on the video (VAAPI/VDPAU) side; Linux gets DRM, Mir/Wayland support, numerous video improvements, and build system changes; iOS gets support for iOS 10, improved VDADecoder support, and general improvements on both TVOS and arm64 IOS; and Windows finally gets 64-bit binaries, along with improved UWP compilation, enhancements to image rendering, and another slew of general platform-specific improvements to how we handle libraries and APIs. ... And Other Things Of course, there have also been a huge number of other changes, some of which will be invisible to very many users. Bluetooth support, CMake build system, visualisations and screensavers, improvements to the JSON-RPC API, improved code stability, performance. and security (as well as general code clean-up in many core areas), remote control changes, web interface changes, logging changes, dependency changes... the list goes on. Do take a look at the change log and detailed commit history (below) if you're really interested in looking behind the curtain! The V18 "Leia" T-shirt Inspired by the "galaxy far, far away" theme, our resident artist Sam went above and beyond and designed perhaps the coolest Kodi announcement video of all time. We loved his work so much that we're modelling the Kodi 18 shirt after it, along with more art to come. Here it is, our newest, coolest shirt: K-18L - available in several shirt colours and not just black or white. Changelog The Kodi 18 changelog wiki page gives a list of changes for this release; those seeking a more technical listing can view the merged pull requests on GitHub. Thanks As always, this is a huge team effort, and our collective thanks go out to all the developers who submitted code, whether that was thousands of lines of a core new feature or a couple of lines to fix a skin bug. Thanks go out to the ecosystem of add-on and skin developers who updated or created new add-ons to use new functionality in Kodi 18.0. Likewise, we're indebted to the many beta and release candidate testers who took time to explore the pre-release application, file bug reports, test fixes and assist the team with resolving issues. And finally ... special thanks go our to our tireless team of forum moderators, and all those who spend time in our forum and enjoy being part of our community to share tips and tricks and help others. Without all of you, this project would be nothing. Help! If you experience any issues or find any remaining bugs, please post in the General Support section of our forum (please be mindful of our forum rules when posting!). If you have fixes for issues please submit a pull request with your changes to our master branch on GitHub. We also welcome users who want to help answer questions in the forum or write articles for the wiki. Donate To show support and appreciation for Kodi, please consider making a donation or purchasing merchandise such as a T-shirt or Raspberry Pi case. All donations or profits go to the XBMC Foundation and are typically used for team travel to attend conferences, operating expenses, hardware and software licences for developers, legal fees, and the annual developer conference. Tags: Release Announcements View the full article...
  15. Belgium, here we come! Team Kodi will be at FOSDEM in Brussels next week. If you live anywhere near, if you're attending, if you can make the detour - please, come along and meet some of the team. FOSDEM is an annual, volunteer, non-commercial event that focuses on free and open source software development. It's primarily aimed at developers, although the talks and stands are open to anyone who's interested. Its main aim is to simply create a meeting place; it's a fantastic opportunity for people to mix, chat, share ideas, collaborate, promote awareness, and generally interact with like-minded individuals. So, every year, thousands of developers from all over the world descend on the Université Libre de Bruxelles to do just that. This year, there'll be representatives of projects such as Gnome, Mozilla, Debian, Python, GitLab, LibreOffice, Apache, VideoLAN (and many, many more) - and some of the Kodi team as well. We won't have a stand but, in between attending and delivering talks and generally mingling, we'd love to meet with our friends in the community who might be reading this. Kodi v18 "Leia" Presentation Martijn from the team will be presenting the final release of Kodi 18, the next release in everyone's favourite media centre software. He will be taking people through the latest features to be introduced, as well as some of the changes that have been made "behind the scenes", and what these mean for developers and users. He'll also set the scene for what you can expect as we now build on these foundations and move in anger towards v19 development. Room H.1309, Saturday 2nd February, 11:00-11:25. Kodi Team Meetup It doesn't matter whether you're a user or developer, whether you work with Kodi or something else, if you have commercial interests, or if you're simply curious. Pop along if you're interested; several Team Kodi members will be present to chat at your leisure. Room H.3242, Saturday 2nd February, 16:00-17:00. More information on the presentation here, meeting here, and on FOSDEM itself here. We hope to see you soon! View the full article...

About Us

CinemaVision began in 2014 as a collaboration to create content for use with your home theater, offering movie trivia slides and video bumpers. It has since grown to be THE PREMIER WAY to create and customize your preshow experience. Download the CinemaVision add-on for Kodi today from the official Kodi repository, and easily create a sequence of trivia, videos, trailers, home automation triggers and more that will bring the experience of a movie theater straight to your screen!

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